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The Dependent Child Resident Visa Definition Explained

by | May 25, 2021 | Articles, Individuals & Families, News & Articles

Estimated Reading Time: 3 mins

The Immigration New Zealand resident visa definition for a dependent child (or for dependent children) is surprisingly broad. This article will explain the Immigration New Zealand resident visa dependent child definition.

Why It Is Important

Your child may be included in your resident visa application under most resident visa categories. Your child may also apply separately for their Dependent Child Resident Visa if you are already a New Zealand Citizen or are an eligible sponsor on a New Zealand resident visa.

The Definition Explained

Your child must meet the Immigration New Zealand resident visa dependent child definition to qualify (along with other evidential requirements). The definition is as follows:

    • If your child is aged 21 to 24 years old, they must have no children of their own, they must be “single”, and they must be “totally or substantially financially reliant on an adult” (does not have to be their parent) whether they live with them or not.
    • If your child is aged 18 to 21 years old, they must have no children of their own and they must be “single”.
    • If your child is aged 17 years old or younger, they must be “single”.

What “Single” Means

It is important to understand what “single” means, as it is a part of the dependent child resident visa definition. Immigration New Zealand defines “single” as “not living with a partner in a genuine and stable relationship”. This means that to not be “single”, they would need to:

    • Live together with a partner; and
    • Be in a genuine relationship with a partner; and
    • Be in a stable relationship with a partner.

For example, if your 17-year-old son has a casual girlfriend and they do not live together, then he is still classified as “single” by Immigration New Zealand.

What “Totally Or Substantially Financially Reliant On An Adult” Means

If your child is aged 21 to 24 years old, one of the requirements to meet the dependent child definition is that they must be “totally or substantially financially reliant on an adult” (does not have to be their parent) whether they live with them or not. The definition for “totally or substantially financially reliant on an adult” is not clear-cut, it depends on each applicant’s situation. To draw a conclusion, Immigration New Zealand will look at the whole application including (but not limited to) the following:

    • Whether the child is carrying out paid work, if this work is full-time or part-time, and how long they work for.
    • Whether the child has any other independent forms of financial support.
    • Whether the child is living with their parent(s) or another family member and how much support is provided by their parent(s) or another family member.
    • Whether the child is studying and if this study is full-time or part-time.

For example, if your 22-year-old daughter lives with you, you pay for all the bills in the house including her bills, and she sells $50 of craft items online each week to earn pocket money, then she is likely to be classified as “totally or substantially financially reliant on an adult”.

How We Can Help

This article was written to provide general guidance only. It is correct at as the date of this article and is subject to further updates. Stay Legal is always happy to provide immigration guidance and solutions. If you have any questions about the Dependent Child Resident, please do not hesitate to contact us.   Please call us +64 7 575 2882 or email hello@staylegal.co.nz.

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